Analysis on ‘The Man Inside’ edit – module 162 T2

For this module I produced a short film titled, ‘The Man Inside’, which follows the story of a divorced couple who end up trapped in a lift together. The film is a comedy/drama, and incorporated a circular narrative structure, opening with a flash forward to instantly engage the audience. Furthering this, we were set the task of editing our footage in a particular style, of which I chose the silent film. After researching and looking at examples of each editing style the silent era seemed one of the most intriguing and appropriate due to our actors characterized facial expressions and the vast amount of features that come with the style.

I watched a number of silent films to gain a better understanding of the ways in which they utilize editing techniques and apply this to create the typical conventions of the silent film. I watched the classics: Nosferatu (1922), The Great Train Robbery (1903), The birth of a Nation (1915) and The Kid (1921) as well as the first recordings from the Lumiere brothers’ Cinematographe; the arrival of the express train at Ciotan and the workers leaving the factory. There is a big time differences between all of these films, yet they are all of the same genre, giving me over twenty years worth of information and features of this style.

A silent film is simply a film that acquires no recorded synchronous sound – diegetic or non-diegetic, and this especially includes spoken dialogue (the introduction of the Vitaphone system in the late 1920’s is when “talkies” kicked off). Silent films instead, relied on facial expressions, gestures, and inter-title cards to express what would be said. From the films I watched I noticed that the actors were very strong, their facial expressions were bold, their gestures were over-exaggerated so they could really convey what was going on in the film. Charlie Chaplin is a perfect example of the kinds of this type of acting; for example, in ‘The Kid’ Chaplin is attempting to stop the baby from crying, we see how clueless he is through his dramatic facial expressions, scratching his head, and his frantic full body movements. One thing I instantly noticed when watching my own film footage back was that the actors’ performances were very theatrical, the engineer was a very animated character and the performance style itself would fit perfectly with a silent film edit.

Despite having no recorded sound, music is a key feature of silent films. As these films were being shown a live pianist or musical orchestra would play to help create the ambience being portrayed on screen and add to the entertainment value. Considering this, I searched for a silent film style piano song to accompany my images. I came across ‘Maple Leaf Rag’ this not only sounded great with the visuals on screen, but also includes the sound of an old projector running in the background, accentuating the realism of watching a silent film in a theatre back in the early 1900s.

With having no spoken dialogue, yet needing to get some discourse across I used inter-titles, a vital component of silent films. The designs for which were different in most silent films, some would be signature; for example D.W. Griffith created a signature title card for ‘The birth of a nation”. I used one inter-title card throughout my film, I was fond of the style as it appeared vintage, and was visually pleasing. The typography back then was all serif, and looked hand printed. I used ‘Charlemagne Std’ as it is a serif, bold font, which is legible and I feel, fits the style.

The camera shots are also very particular in silent films, the shots are normally quite long in duration; for example the opening shot in ‘The Great Train Robbery’ is 67 seconds long, as well as being completely static, long shot. Opening/establishing shots in contemporary film tend to be under ten seconds, signifying the extent of difference in technology, style, and general practice in filming and cinematography, which is being perfected over the years. The camera was usually very large back in the early days of filming, and was manually operated by a hand crank – this made it impossible to create pans and hard to do tilts and movement. The majority of our shots were static, with the occasional tilting. As we took hundreds of shots on the day, we ended up with quite a few extended shots, which I included where possible. I took the frame rate down slightly to 20 FPS, silent films had an FPS ranging from 12 to 24, and more commonly at the beginning of the era it would lie at around 16 FPS. Also, I sped up the film slightly from 100% speed rate to 120% – silent films often look as though they are being played in a faster than average motion, this is so it would appear more energetic and engaging. The speed of silent films also depended on the hand crank, so it was the man turning the handle who controlled the speed, which was difficult to manage at a regular speed.

The iris circle transition was exceptionally common during the silent era, as they were much more limited with their video effects. To fit my film, it seemed only right to use cuts, and the iris circle transition only to really gage the era. The cuts were not always perfect in silent films, as they would physically have to cut the film and stick it together where they thought best, not having the computer technology we have now. A few of my cuts are disjointed, to replicate this effect. I also put a ‘dust and scratches’ effect and used ‘overlay’ to merge the effect to the footage, this makes the film appear as though it is being projected rather than shown digitally from the over exposed lighting flashes. The dust and scratches effect makes the film appear as though it has been stored and damaged over many years, a trait common in the silent films we are shown as a contemporary audience, which is also quite trademark for the style.

 

1. The views expressed and materials presented represent the personal views of the author and should not be taken to represent the opinions, policy, or views of the Department of Media, or of Coventry University, nor any of its employees or other students

2. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The author of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site, or found by following any link on this site.

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Script for Documentary ‘Struggle with life and race against time’ 162

Here is the script for our documentary to be shot on Friday 15th February, the script follows the journey of a man, and his struggle in becoming the success that he is today. 


Struggle with life and Race against time

Shots of the plane landing and family seeing grandfather. Will here plane noise, cut to family hugging (silent + soft music). Halfway, he will start speaking.

When a human is born on earth, God sends him with a purpose. To follow karma, working in the interest and good faith for others. I believe that if you fight that karma, God will definitely give you a reward, as and when your time comes.

I was born on the 25th March 1948 in the city Nadiad, which is located in Kheda District, Gujarat, India. I began school up until the 8th Standard at Sonarola High School. My parents had a small, tailoring business and after 1962 we had to shift to another village.

I passed my matriculation exam in 1964 and then joined Nadiad’s College for further study. Unfortunately, after a few months I had to leave college. My family’s condition became extremely poor. We couldn’t afford anything. I had to give up studying to gain money for a roof over our head. We were living in a room, which we all shared.

I wanted to study further. But financial struggles erupted. My dreams were to become a Chartered Accountant.

I became a typist.

1965. I was earning 911 rupees per month, which is £10.86 in pounds. Three years passed and I went onto becoming a junior clerk. At this time of crisis and struggle, I always questioned myself ‘What is my purpose? Did I have one? Challenging my words, belief and faith. Three years passed and I went onto becoming a junior clerk. At this time of crisis and struggle, I always questioned myself ‘What is my purpose? Did I have one? Challenging my words, belief and faith. During these few years, I had saved up some money. I began studying my Bachelor of Commerce in 1971.

As well as working at the same time, it was difficult for me to fit studying and reading in. When I got home it was late and due to limited space or bedrooms, there was nowhere for me to read books in the night. And so I read under the streetlights in the dirty gullies.

I went on to joining the big city, Ahmedabad. My next job involved being a Clerical Officer at ‘The Kaira District Central Co-operative Bank LTD’. In this period of time I gradually completed my Masters of Commerce in 1975.

I have to say that during these 25 years, it was difficult, struggle, hard and painful. But the outcome and learning process was vital and unforgettable. The ladder I climbed was my journey.

Today, I have my own house in Ahmedabad. I am a professional Bank Manager at ‘The Sanans Urban Co-operative Bank LTD’ and thoroughly enjoy my job. I got married in 1975. Through this struggle with life, my wife gave me full support and stood with me in every situation. She now works in the State Government. I also have two children, a daughter (1979) and a son (1980) whom both now happily live in England.

I would like to take this time out to mention that I am very proud of my childhood period. Even though my father was earning less in which we were unable to stand on our two legs, I still am thankful for everything he did for me. He never let the struggle and poorness get in the way, and kept smiling. Since then I have promised him that I would never disappoint him. At that time I had no sources to make him happy except my hard work, effort and love. Now I know he is watching me and is proud.

As a family, we suffered many difficulties. But God gave us strength to fight.

When a human is born on earth, God sends him with a purpose. And my purpose is what defines me. This is story of my journey from being a helpless, brave typist, to a hard working, proud Grandfather.

1. The views expressed and materials presented represent the personal views of the author and should not be taken to represent the opinions, policy, or views of the Department of Media, or of Coventry University, nor any of its employees or other students

 

2. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The author of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site, or found by following any link on this site.

 

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The congenial Devil: The Final Script

The Congenial Devil

Click the link to view the script 🙂

1. The views expressed and materials presented represent the personal views of the author and should not be taken to represent the opinions, policy, or views of the Department of Media, or of Coventry University, nor any of its employees or other students

2. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The author of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site, or found by following any link on this site.

3. Neither the Author nor host will be liable for any errors or omissions in this information, nor for the availability of this information. The Author and host will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.

162 Module: First Draft of Script

The Congenial Devil First Draft Script

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Character profiles for 162

Tommy – 28 years old, white British male born and raised in Winchester, now living in a flat in Islington. He is from a middle class family, an only child. Works with a home furnishing manufacturer based in the business design centre; though he is does not enjoy his job, he aims to become a CEO, he has the talent and knowledge to reach his goals; he just doesn’t have the drive.

Evie – 27 years old, white British female who was born in Cumbria, where she lived for 12 years, her family then moved to Winchester where she lived for 6 years before moving to London to study Journalism. She now lives in Camden with her husband, they met when she was 22; he was 26 and married four years later. She currently writes for the Daily Mail.

Their relationship: They met when they were 12/13 years old when Evie moved to Winchester, they lived just five minutes away from each other, and went to the same school. They were inseparable. Evie was there for Tommy during his fathers illness and eventual passing when they were just 16, bringing the pair closer together than ever. Evie would stay with Tommy for days on end; she became a valued member of his family, and was closer to Tommy’s mother than her own. Evie’s sister showed brief interest in Tommy when they were 18, this caused friction between the pair, but Tommy was not interested in her sister, and the situation blew over fairly quickly, though Evie became more and more distant from her own family. Evie saw Tommy as the brother she never had, she loved him like family, but never romantically. Tommy never told her his true feelings, whenever he had wanted to, or come close, something inside had stopped him, a little voice in his head too scared to risk letting her go, and ruining what they had. Though he still had hope that they would end up together, he believed she was the one, and never had a serious relationship due to this belief.

 

1. The views expressed and materials presented represent the personal views of the author and should not be taken to represent the opinions, policy, or views of the Department of Media, or of Coventry University, nor any of its employees or other students

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Treatment for 162

A: There is a hammering on a door, it opens to reveal a dishevelled

breathless person, why? How did they get this way…

Tommy, fairly young, perhaps late twenties. He has been in love with his dear friend for many, many years – since they were young teens; however she’s married to another man. They are best friends, they share everything – she tells him everything that goes on in the marriage from good to bad, and he listens and advises his friend as well as he can, acting as a shoulder to cry on, despite his insane jealousy and irrevocable love for her.

He’s having a bad night on this particular evening, feeling down and lonely – hopeless even. He’s hitting the alcohol hard, drinking a bottle of Jack Daniels straight – maybe beer, with bottles lying around the apartment, as he lounges in his joggers and an old t-shirt whilst watching T.V. – we see pictures in the apartment, full of images of this girl, Evie – and them together, and finally at her wedding.

This is when he hears the knocking, it must be 1:20am now, and he is not expecting anybody. The knocking is frantic, loud. He is anxious, worried about opening the door, afraid of what or who he will find. As he opens the door he see’s Evie,  whom he is deeply in love with, looking disheveled, yet expressionless – despite tears running down her pale white cheeks. Her eyes are void of emotion; she seems completely out of it – traumatised.

He is worried about her state, and what has happened to her, but he is happy that she is there, in his apartment. He let’s her in and sits her down, putting the kettle on. He kneels beside her, takes her hand and asks what has happened, but she stares past him, like she doesn’t even realize he’s there.

He looks over and sees a picture of Evie and Tommy together, he reflects back to that memory, a bright day in an open field, they are acting like children, having fun. There are brief moments where it seems as though the romance may blossom, but it never does.

Tommy comes back to reality.

He becomes more worried now, he asks about her husband, where he is, if he hurt her, if they’d had a fight. He becomes angry at the thought of him hurting his friend. As his anger grows, she slowly looks at him, still expressionless. She whispers three words “he left me”.  And stares back into space. Tommy is in a dilemma, he can’t deny his relief, and it shows briefly, though he snaps back into worry, as his dear, beloved friend is in pain, and this causes him more pain, he wants her happiness more than anything. He brings her tea, sets it down, and attempts to comfort her, he offers for her to stay at his flat for as long as she needs, tells her it will all be ok, and generally reassuring her. He asks her if there was anyway they would be able to work it out, that maybe they had both just over reacted. This is when he really looks at her, really looks. He notices blood stains on her hand – they’ve tried to be scrubbed off, but light red stains remain, she stands and a blood-stained knife falls out of an inside pocket of her jacket.

Everything becomes clear, “I couldn’t let him go.” She says, coldly – in a whisper.

Tommy is evidently afraid – eyes wide and mouth open, as the panic in his expression grows, we fade out.

 

1. The views expressed and materials presented represent the personal views of the author and should not be taken to represent the opinions, policy, or views of the Department of Media, or of Coventry University, nor any of its employees or other students

2. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The author of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site, or found by following any link on this site

3. Neither the Author nor host will be liable for any errors or omissions in this information, nor for the availability of this information. The Author and host will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.

Final Pitch: 162

I have now chosen my final idea which I will continue to focus on and develop, I have written a short pitch and will go on to write up an outline, treatment and character profiles so that I can write an engaging script. If this idea comes to a creative standstill or any other ideas pop into my head I will work on them as well, and develop whichever idea works best and that I feel would have the best appeal and make the most successful script.

Pitch: 

After a fight with her husband, Evie rushes to best friend Tommy’s house. In complete shock she knocks frantically at his door, and is invited in. Tommy has been in love with Evie for years, and is not sad at the thought of her husband voicing his decision to leave her. Though Evie’s bloodstained hands and weapon of choice suggest she did not simply let her husband go.

 

1. The views expressed and materials presented represent the personal views of the author and should not be taken to represent the opinions, policy, or views of the Department of Media, or of Coventry University, nor any of its employees or other students

2. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The author of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site, or found by following any link on this site.

3. Neither the Author nor host will be liable for any errors or omissions in this information, nor for the availability of this information. The Author and host will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.