Funding our first independent film!

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/once-bitten-twice-shy–2?show_todos=true

So, we’re coming to the end of first year now and there’s a whole summer of nothing ahead of us, which obviously means it’s time to get producing a kick ass short film!

‘Once Bitten, Twice Shy’ was written by the talented script writer Natasha Harmer, it’s a horror/thriller film, and is currently in the pre-production stage. The preparation for the film is coming a long brilliantly, the team is really coming together, the script is being finalised and written to perfection, actors are being contacted and the dream location is becoming a reality! This film will be perfect practice for our third year project and help set us up for any future work and projects out of University!

This project is in motion and has the potential to be something great, we aim to enter it into film festivals and let the world see our progress and hard work on the big screen.

Obviously, for this film to be a success we need funding, and being students the best way to get the money to create a professional film is to raise awareness and look for donations or any help that we can get! We need around £2000, so anything you can give, or any help in raising awareness for our film would be very much appreciated!

For your help we are offering a free DVD copy of the completed film, and you can be credited as ‘associate producer’ for your help no matter how big or small it may be!

All information on helping us out can be found at the link at the top of this page, a long with links to the script and information on the writer.

Thank you! We’re looking forward to hearing from you 🙂

Week one TV Studio

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We picked our roles for the television studio a few days ago – on the 19th of March. I pitched for gallery sound and was lucky enough for my group to vote me into that role.

this week is really about getting more comfortable in our roles, it’s the last session with the mentors so after this session we will be working more independently, which I am looking forward to. It’s all well and good being guided at the start but I think without the mentors we will all become more assertive in our own roles and rely on ourselves and each other more.

We were still fairly slow at setting up but it’s a lot quicker than it was when we first came in and I’m confident that in a few weeks we’ll be set up within 10 minutes. I have experience with sound in a theatre setting – but this is my first time working on sound in a television studio so I was excited to run through a practise show with all our designated roles set. In terms of sound this week it was all fairly simple, we only had one rifle microphone booked out because the radio microphones were pre-booked by somebody else so setting up for sound was very fast and I only had three channels to work with, which consisted of the rifle microphone for studio sound and the VT sound channels (7 and 8).

Though I didn’t have anything too complex to deal with it was really helpful to see how everyone worked together, and to get used to the levels of the video tapes and work with set timings, in theatre it didn’t matter too much if we ran over by a few minutes time-wise but in the television studio it’s imperative that we stick to our timings and get good practise of being punctual for our final live show so we can finish exactly on 12 minutes.

The One Show review/analysis

The One Show is a live magazine show, which is broadcast daily and produced by the BBC. I’ve seen bits of the show before, but never sat down and watched a full episode, and to be totally honest, I can’t see myself sitting down to watch it for my own entertainment anytime soon. Don’t get me wrong, the show fulfills its purpose well, it informs, educates, keeps viewers up to date with current news, but for me the entertainment side just does not call out to me.

The show definitely incorporates a bright and vibrant visual appearance, including the furniture, luminous on set lights, and the large windows represent the location; London, an iconic city and view. The windows also come in handy for allowing the set to look more spacious and free, rather than being closed in. The studio looks very modern, which will appeal to a contemporary audience. The set itself is pretty minimal and simplistic, making the audience concentrate more on the presenters themselves as well as the guests – with just a bright, colourful aura surrounding them. This is visually pleasing, and the vibrant colours will appeal to younger audiences and engage their initial attention. There is also a studio audience who watch the show as it goes out live, giving it more appeal as the viewer can get more involved with the show, and as sitting in the audience for the show is free, I’m sure it’s filled out every day. A studio audience is also a positive attribute because it gives a real reaction to the show and the producers can monitor how the show is being perceived.

The regular presenters consist of Alex Jones and Matt Baker, with Chris Evans appearing on Fridays instead of Baker. All the presenters are between the ages of 30 and 50 years old – signifying the round-a-bout age of the target audience. The presenters are well known TV personalities, and have all worked in the industry for a long time including work in radio, childrens TV and general reporting. They are energetic, and have a vibrant character, they’re up to date in current affairs making them perfect for the role and the friendly ambience they create appeals to viewers.

The music for the show is upbeat; it consists mainly of a trumpet and choir-style singing over the top. It starts the show with a positive, upbeat ambience to engage the audience, and bring in viewers – especially adults who’ve spent the day at work, and are ready to sit down and relax. The graphics are 3D and the typography itself consists of a font very similar; if not the same as the BBC logo itself, adding the intertextuality and instant recognition of the production brand/company.

The shows content is pretty light, in the episode I watched it included interviews and music from Olivia Newton John and Billy Bragg (two very successful stars, signifying the success of the show). It also looks at current issues, and issues which effect everyday people – such as fraud and real life experiences – in the episode I watched around five minutes was dedicated to a fraudulent ‘Amazon’ sight and included an interview with a man who had lost £920 to this site buying a television. Therefore, the content is relatable to the audience and guest stars, such as the two previously mentioned, are there for entertainment value and promotion for themselves more often than not.

The guests vary every day, this keeps the audience entertained and interested, and allows them to look forward to certain episodes if a particular guest appeals to them personally. The guests on the episode I watched are of similar age to the target audience, and are well-known throughout generations (I’d hope at least!). But the guests are not always celebrities, and there have been episodes with members of the public who have done charity work or been in the news who have been guests on the show. This opens up the show to the public even more, making it even more relatable and current.

There are many VT’s that run throughout the show; they are in keeping with the key themes or issues being brought up. There were clips of the celebrity guests at their height of fame, performing. Also, they used clips that they had produced recently, for example the interview with the man who was a victim to the Amazon fraud website, warning people on this issue.  The VT clips are used quite often, however this allows the viewer to get out of the studio and adds more variety and substance to the show.

So overall, though it does not quite manage to keep me engaged throughout, the show is a very successful magazine, and I’m sure my mum would enjoy it!

Disclaimer

1. The views expressed and materials presented represent the personal views of the author and should not be taken to represent the opinions, policy, or views of the Department of Media, or of Coventry University, nor any of its employees or other students.

2. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The author of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site, or found by following any link on this site.

3. Neither the Author nor host will be liable for any errors or omissions in this information, nor for the availability of this information. The Author and host will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.

Reflection 4 – P2P Completion

Our subject: Surendrakumar Bhagat

Our subject: Surendrakumar Bhagat

I believe that as a group we produced an engaging documentary, which was both visually pleasing, and had an interesting story to support it. We got together as a group as often as we could to discuss our documentary throughout the entire process and I think this really helped for us all to get a sense of what we were aiming to achieve and share opinions.

In terms of the editing process, Meera took on the main editors role with the rest of the group viewing the documentary at different stages so that we could give feedback and advice on how to improve. This included, changing the subtitles, as they were not completely fluent or easy to understand on occasion. We also assisted in picking which shots would be the most effective and visually pleasing.

I would have preferred to have more input in the editing process, it was a personal documentary and was difficult for all of us to really get the chance to experiment with the footage.

I learnt a lot about the documentary process, especially with the overall pacing of our product, we initially had tried to fit in more footage than we should have, not leaving enough time for the audience to reflect on what they were watching. So, although we were proud of some of the shots, we cut them out and were left with a much better final product. We got on very well as a group and stayed in constant communication. We could have been more organized in certain areas: setting up, booking out equipment. But, these are things that we can work on and I am pleased with the final product.

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1. The views expressed and materials presented represent the personal views of the author and should not be taken to represent the opinions, policy, or views of the Department of Media, or of Coventry University, nor any of its employees or other students

2. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The author of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site, or found by following any link on this site.

3. Neither the Author nor host will be liable for any errors or omissions in this information, nor for the availability of this information. The Author and host will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.

Reflection 3 P2P Shooting Process – 160 T2

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Shooting took place on February 15th, three weeks before the deadline so we had plenty of time to perfect our documentary.

We started early, setting up the equipment straight away. As this was a new setting for myself and two other group members we had to work as quickly and efficiently as we could to set up a visually pleasing setting and really work on the ambience. We managed, unfortunately it meant the subject waiting round longer than he’d have liked, which could have been overcome if we had visited the setting earlier and planned the set up then. We distinguished roles quickly and got straight into filming.

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Unfortunately when playing back our audio for the interview we came across a layer of noise, a constant static playing from a faulty microphone. Luckily we had brought back-up equipment and connected a boom microphone into the Edirol to be synced in editing later – this came out clear, and filming the subject the second time round also led to a more fluent and relaxed interview.

We used two halogen lights and flooded the room with a warm, bright yellow colour, to create a homely, relaxed ambience. We used static shots of the subject for the main body of the interview, and included lots of other footage including images of photographs, religious symbols and Gods, cutaway exterior shots to add realism, and a tracking shot in the kitchen of the whole family, which was also a problem – though it’s a nice looking shot, the dolly got caught in the floor tiles, we used a carpet to smooth the movement, and it helped but was not perfect.
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1. The views expressed and materials presented represent the personal views of the author and should not be taken to represent the opinions, policy, or views of the Department of Media, or of Coventry University, nor any of its employees or other students

2. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The author of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site, or found by following any link on this site.

3. Neither the Author nor host will be liable for any errors or omissions in this information, nor for the availability of this information. The Author and host will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.